<![CDATA[ExperienceUSHistory - Preservationist]]>Fri, 23 Jul 2021 06:18:48 -0500Weebly<![CDATA[Historic Context and Preservation of Alexander Brothers' Manufactury (contemporarily known as Mill Race Inn) Justifies Inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places]]>Sun, 16 May 2021 05:00:00 GMThttp://experienceushistory.com/preservationist/mill_race_innPicture
ABSTRACTIn Geneva, IL, about 100 yards east of the Fox River, a small, nondescript, boarded-up limestone structure lingers behind a chain-link fence. Humble in appearance, the building's history stretches back to the early beginnings of this prairie town and its first white settlers. Very little such utilitarian vernacular architecture dating from the first ten years of a settlement remain in Illinois. Even fewer were occupied by the diverse businesses representative of how commerce evolved in a community. Originally built by Julius and Edward Alexander and Lyman German, the Alexander brothers' manufactory - contemporarily known as Mill Race Inn - exemplified the practical architecture of an emerging nineteenth century settlement and the changes in commerce ordinary residents experienced from its erection around 1846 to the height of the depression in 1933.

FULL TEXT: Historic Context and Preservation of Alexander Brothers' Manufacturory
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<![CDATA[Museum Evaluation: Naper Settlement]]>Thu, 08 Apr 2021 05:00:00 GMThttp://experienceushistory.com/preservationist/naper-settlementPicture
ABSTRACT: Naper Settlement is an outdoor museum of nineteenth-century midwest American village life located near downtown Naperville, IL, a western suburb of Chicago. Established in 1969, the thirteen acre property contains thirty historical structures highlighted by the Martin Mitchell Mansion, gifted to Naperville by Caroline Martin Mitchell in 1936. Approximately half of the buildings in the museum are original structures, most from downtown Naperville moved to the site in the 1970’s. The buildings are scattered about the property connected by brick paths so it is not laid out as a model of village.

FULL TEXT: Museum Evaluation: Naper Settlement
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